Cervical Spinal Stenosis Surgery

Cervical spinal stenosis surgery is just one option for treating this condition that can cause pinched nerves in the neck, spinal cord compression, neck pain, paraesthesia, numbness, weakness, and a variety of other symptoms. Spinal stenosis in the cervical spine is commonly caused by whiplash, trauma, general wear and tear, cervical spinal arthritis, and congenital structural abnormalities. Inflammation can also be the cause of narrowing in the spinal column but this is not usually treated with cervical spinal stenosis surgery.

Cervical Spinal Stenosis Surgery Options

Conservative treatments are the first line in cervical spinal stenosis treatment but where these have become ineffective against the neck pain, radiculopathy, or where myelopathy is present, surgery is usually necessary. Mechanical compression of the nerves in the spine is often only relieved by decompression back surgery such as a foraminotomy, laminectomy, laminotomy, or an extensive laminectomy with spinal fusion. Stenosis at more than one level in the cervical spine is more likely to be treated with a spinal fusion procedure in order to provide some stability in the spine and, hopefully, slow down further degeneration of the cervical spine.

Choosing Cervical Spinal Stenosis Surgery

Patients with a herniated disc in the neck may be advised to stick with conservative treatments and are likely to see improvements over ten weeks or so of such therapy. Neck pain medications to reduce inflammation and discomfort are helpful for bulging discs and herniated discs in the neck and may allow the cervical spine time to heal whilst reducing immediate nerve compression and symptoms of cervical spinal stenosis. Patients may be advised to use this time, where appropriate, to quit smoking, lose weight, and to try to improve their general health in order to improve their likelihood of success with cervical spinal stenosis surgery.